March 30, 2017

72 Hour Bug Out Bag List; by GraphixStation.com

Some years ago, I had the pleasure of getting to know the owner of GraphixStation.com through email. Over the years, they have created all of the logos for the Prepared Christian blog, facebook and twitter pages, as well as the Preparedness Club. Sometimes I have an idea of what I want but don’t do a very good job expressing it. They knock it out of the park every single time!

I recently got an email with a .pdf attachment containing a very nice looking 72 Hour Bug Out Bag List. The email said that after so many friends and family asked what should go in one, they made this list so they could just hand it out! What a fantastic idea! I have been given permission to hand it out to all of you!

You might need to tweak the list but, for the most part, I think it is pretty solid. It being in .pdf form means you can print it, download it or email it to loved ones who can benefit.

72 Hour Bug Out Bag List; by GraphixStation

To download the 72 Hour Bug Out Bag List; by GraphixStation, right click on the link or the image, and “save file/target as”.

If you are ever in need of graphics design work, I cannot recommend GraphixStation highly enough! Fellow Prepared Christian and very talented!

Comments

  1. Gino Schafer says:

    How much does this bag weigh fully loaded? I’m not sure I could carry all this.

    • Chris Ray says:

      You bring up a point I think many people get hung up on. Where do you plan on bugging out that you would need to carry the beg the entire way? I plan on driving, so I need to be able to carry it to and from the car. If there is some type of event that makes vehicular travel impossible, shopping carts, wagons, attaching it to a bicycle are all options.

      This bag reflects one of the prepper mottos, “I would rather have it and not need it, then need it and not have it.” The purpose of a bug out bag it to provide you with all of the needed supplies for 72 hours, some people can get away with less, some more.

    • My question exactly. I would like to see such a bag, and try and pick the thing up.

  2. So I will say this was surprisingly complete. Generally what I have and would suggest.

    The hennessy Hammock however may not be good. I actually gave mine away after keeping the tarp for it. I duplicated the cover tarps rigging on a cheap $20 hammock and sleep like a log. I could never sleep well in the hennessy. (He makes them 30 km from my hose as the crow flys, so initially I like to shop local)

    I can make a shelter, so its not important, but the weight difference was substantial. 2.5 lbs to under a lb.

    Id also go mountain house or dried beans etc.. I can go on packed food for a week easily with out resorting to foraging.

  3. Rev. Dr. Michael E Harris says:

    I keep my bag in my car, but it is a bit heavy. If I had to wear my backpack for too long, I would collapse. Since I intend to bug out with my car (if not, I will bug in), the weight is not a real concern.

    However, I really am concerned with the weight of all my preps. I have an Israeli military bag that weighs close to 100 pounds for extras, but I intended to empty it in pieces.

    • because of some problems with my left leg, I would have trouble carrying my pack for any moderate distance. I bought a collapsible wagon that’ll support the weight and keep it in the trunk.

    • Rev.,
      One of the things I did was rearrange our bags significantly. It’s much more like the original hurricane/fire evac kits we started with now.

      We have packs with bare bones survival in multi climate and limited lightweight foods and meds, some water and collection/purification items.

      Then in other containers are heavy food and lots of water (latter in a bucket already attached to a fold-out dolly), more of the entertainment, emergency radio, changes of “real” clothes, and extra socks and underwear (the packs are set up to change and dry and re-wear those, and with only rain gear and thermals and light undershirts and shorts). The other containers also hold the bigger first aid kits and tools, and the more comfortable sleeping systems, whereas the pack has enough for an ugly sling, tampons for bleeders, and blister care and bivy-thermal for sleeping/

      The kit is now arranged to be The Family Vagabond, or to be super comfortable camping or at a hotel, with some of it in bags or quick grab options to go with packs and some of it pretty much automatically abandoned if the truck gets stuck on a dark deserted bush road 50 miles from the destination.

      Having the food and clothing in separate containers also makes it soooo much easier (and less noticeable) to rotate the ones that are more perishable and bring things in to check fit and comfort.

      Cheers!

  4. I asked this in another group. I am looking for a bug out style bag that would hang off the back of my truck set head rest … I have seen full bags, but that would be too bulky for my use … I am looking for something that could hang, not be bulky when filled, but useful and practical … ideas?

  5. Hi! I’ve been reading your website for a long time now and finally got
    the courage to go ahead and give you a shout out
    from Kingwood Tx! Just wanted to say keep up the great job!

  6. Rev. Dr. Michael E Harris says:

    In the prepper world, there are many definitions of a bub out bag (BOB). I have read about the mid-sized backpack (or day pack)–this is the one that CERT espouses, up to the back of a pickup truck.

    I prefer the mid-sized backpack–one that has all the stuff that I really need and can actually carry. I do have other items in my car–driver’s side door pocket, glove compartment, and trunk. The trunk has my LARGE Israeli combat bag (I have trouble carrying it when filled).

    Our county’s OEM is presenting a two-hour disaster presentation next week. One of the presentations is on the BOB (Ted calls it a go bag). Ted is from my CERT, so I have seen his presentation before. Ted managed to find a good backpack for less than $10 (hard to believe). In his presentation, he unloads the bag piece-by-piece and explains what it is (he usually has a list printed out for the audience). This takes 15 or 20 minutes and it is amazing what he can squeeze into the bag. However, it takes him more than an hour to put it all back in.

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